Marshall Plan Resources

The Economic Cooperation Authority

Officials as of July 1, 1949, Overseas ECA Missions, Creation and Authority, The Administrator for Economic Cooperation, Bilateral and Multilateral Undertakings, U.S. Special Representative Abroad, Special ECA Missions Abroad, Public Advisory Board, Joint Congressional Committee, Termination of Program, and China Aid.

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Charles P. Kindleberger on the Economic Background

The following document was written by economist Charles P. Kindleberger, who was working for the Department of State (Acting Director, Office of Economic Security Policy), in preparing the Truman administration’s presentation to the Congress of the enabling legislation for the Marshall Plan (Economic Cooperation Act of 1948). The original is in the State Department records (Record Group 59 [Central Decimal File 840.50 Recovery/7-2248]) at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland. For other documents by Kindleberger, see his Marshall Plan Days (Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1987). In the document below, material in brackets has been added by the editor (Larry Bland).

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Examples of Marshall Plan Aid

The Marshall Plan was a complex undertaking that is not easily described. The following are a few examples of specific program operations.

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George F. Kennan on the Strategic Background

General Marshall had first met Kennan in 1944. A man with extensive experience in Soviet affairs, Kennan sent the State Department a “Long Telegram” from Moscow on February 22, 1946, summarizing Soviet- American relations and the Soviet threat; it had considerable impact upon those in the government who read it. In early 1947, Marshall decided to reorganize that part of the State Department that controlled information and communications flow and to initiate a “think tank” called the Policy Planning Staff to consider what issues might become important foreign policy issues. Kennan began his new job in May 1947, about the time the socio-economic crises in Europe had become the key issue for the United States. This document is addressed to Kennan’s friend, Charles E. Bohlen, another expert on the U.S.S.R., who was then Counselor of the State Department. The original is in the State Department records (Record Group 59 [Records of Charles E. Bohlen, Box 6]) at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland. In the document below, material in brackets has been added by the editor (Larry Bland).

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Marshall and the “Plan”

Marshall’s Worldview in Early 1947, The Truman Doctrine, Moscow Foreign Ministers’ Conference, and the Decision to Propose a New U.S. Aid Policy

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BBC Correspondent Leonard Miall and the Marshall Plan Speech: An Interview

Marshall Foundation Librarian Barbara Vandegrift interviewed Mr. Miall on September 19, 1977, in the Library in Lexington, Virginia.

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