Eisenhower, Marshall and McCarthy: A Curious Political History

April 18, 2019

Please join us for

“Eisenhower, Marshall and McCarthy: A Curious Political History”
with Dr. William I. Hitchcock

Thursday, April 18, 2019
5:30 pm with reception to follow

Pogue Auditorium
George C. Marshall Foundation
VMI Parade, Lexington, Virginia

Reservations required by calling Leigh McFaddin at 540-463-7103, ext. 138 or by email to reservations@marshallfoundation.org. Seating will be first come, first served. Members and students will be admitted free; non-members will pay $15 at the door.

A part of the George C. Marshall Legacy Series

About the lecture

Senator Joe McCarthy, one of the leading architects of the “Red Scare” in America in the 1950s, infamously slandered Gen. George Marshall, and accused him of being part of a “conspiracy” against the United States. McCarthy’s accusations drew condemnation from across the political spectrum. But one major figure of the day, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, a protégé of Marshall, remained quiet. Why? This talk will take us back to the politics of the election of 1952, Eisenhower’s campaign, and the complicated role of McCarthyism in it.

About Dr. William I. Hitchcock

William I. Hitchcock is the William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He has written and edited numerous books on the international, diplomatic and military history of the 20th Century, in particular the era of the world wars and the cold war. He received his B.A. degree from Kenyon College in 1986, and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1994. His 2008 book, The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe (NYC: Free Press), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and a winner of the George Louis Beer Prize.

His most recent book, published in March 2018, is The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s, which appeared on the New York Times bestseller list. He lives in Charlottesville with his wife, Elizabeth Varon, who is a historian of the US Civil War.