George C. Marshall and the Early Cold War, 1945-49

January 24, 2019

Please join us for:

“George C. Marshall and the Early Cold War, 1945-49”
with Dr. Melvyn P. Leffler

Thursday, January 24, 2019
5:30 pm with reception to follow

Pogue Auditorium
George C. Marshall Foundation
VMI Parade, Lexington, Virginia

Reservations required by calling Leigh McFaddin at 540-463-7103, ext. 138 or by email to reservations@marshallfoundation.org. Seating will be first come, first served. Members and students will be admitted free; non-members will pay $15 at the door.

A part of the George C. Marshall Legacy Series

About the lecture

George Marshall decisively shaped the contours of the early Cold War. Employing strategic insights from World War II, Marshall shrewdly assessed the threat posed by the Soviet Union, set priorities, and designed the strategy that established America’s preponderant position in the international arena. At the same time he knowingly contributed to the onset of the Cold War. This lecture will assess Marshall’s enduring legacy.

About Dr. Melvyn P. Leffler

Dr. Melvyn P. Leffler is Edward Stettinius Professor of American History at The University of Virginia. He is the author of several books on the Cold War, including For the Soul of Mankind (2007), which won the George Louis Beer Prize from the American Historical Association, and A Preponderance of Power (1993), which won the Bancroft, Hoover, and Ferrell Prizes. In 2010, he and Odd Arne Westad co-edited the three volume Cambridge History of the Cold War. Leffler was the Harmsworth Professor at Oxford in 2002-3, and previously served as president of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations. Along with Jeff Legro and Will Hitchcock, he is co-editor of an important volume on comparative strategy, Shaper Nations (Harvard University Press, 2016). His most recent book is Safeguarding Democratic Capitalism: U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security, 1920-2015 (Princeton University Press, 2017). He continues to research and write about the foreign policies of the George W. Bush administration. From 1997-2001, he was the Dean of the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at The University of Virginia.