Marshall Plan Films and Italian Cinema at Marshall Museum

Dr. Regina Longo will discuss “Marshall Plan Films and Italian Cinema” on May 10 beginning at 5:30 pm in the Pogue Auditorium at the Marshall Foundation in Lexington.

Using Marshall Plan film productions in Italy as a case study, Dr. Longo will screen a selection of these films that shed light on the role of state-sponsored visual information campaigns in Italy at the beginning of the Cold War. The documentaries produced by and for the Marshall Plan in Italy also helped to reinvigorate transnational collaborations in feature filmmaking. They played a large part in the creation of the era known as “Hollywood on the Tiber” during the 1950s and 1960s when Hollywood and international productions flocked to Italy’s Cinecittà studios to produce films, such as Roman Holiday and La Dolca Vita, for global audiences.

Regina Longo is the associate editor of Film Quarterly. She has taught in the School of Film and Media Studies at SUNY Purchase, the department of Film and Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the Film and Media Studies department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received a Ph.D. from the Department of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and has published articles in The Journal of the Moving Image, Screening the Past and California Italian Studies. 

Reservations are required by calling Leigh McFaddin at 540-463-7103, ext. 138 or by email to reservations@marshallfoundation.org. Seating will be first come, first served. Members and students will be admitted free; non-members will pay $15 at the door.

Visitors are invited to see the new special exhibition, “Hope for Those Who Need It,” that is on display in the Lower Gallery. This exhibit was named by USA Today as one of the best to see this spring.

This sequence of the Marshall Legacy Series explores how the idea for the Marshall Plan developed after World War II as an alternative to the harsh terms included in the peace treaty following World War I, how the Marshall Plan evolved from an idea that Marshall proposed in a speech into a fully functioning economic recovery program, and the important role that Marshall played in ensuring the success of the plan bearing his name.

The Marshall Plan sequence is being presented in part with sponsorship from Carnegie Corporation of New York.

The George C. Marshall Legacy Series interprets General Marshall’s legacy during a four-year series of exhibitions, speakers and programs centered on key themes or episodes from General Marshall’s career.